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A few words of questionable wisdom from author Al W Moe - you can leave questions on each blog or go to my profile for direct email.

 	 		 		


Tuesday, September 8, 2015

How's Your Amazon Scout Program Book Doing?

I was late to the party here, didn't know about Amazon Scout until well after it launched the first books about six months ago. If you are like me,  Amazon had a brainstorm and came up wit the idea that perhaps it would be good to have a quasi-crowd-sourcing kind of publishing deal with independent authors. Damned if I understand any more now than I did 180 days ago.

The actual Kindle Scout site with information for authors is more detailed, but in a nutshell you will have to have a completed novel. In addition, you still have to have a quality cover, you still have to submit your work, and then you have to wait for about 45-days while Amazon hosts the first 5,000 words of your book at their Scout site so readers can pick and choose which books are really worth publishing.

That's right. The readers choose which books are hot and which are not, by voting. I like that idea, but then it gets weird. Amazon makes the final decisions, regardless of how "hot" your book remains during the 30-day period it is listed. If they choose your book, you get a $1,500 royalty advance (which is very cool), but of course that is hedged against future earnings, and Amazon pays only 50% of each ebook's sales price. Right now I get 70%. Is this a good deal?

What's Good?

Well, there is the possibility that the advance publicity and extra publicity Amazon will offer the chosen few will boost sales, but who knows? And, I have to admit, I'm perplexed about whether to submit a book and then drive my list of readers to the listing to get votes. Why? Because I would want them to vote for my book. And that's bad, why?

Well, to get readers to actually vote, Amazon offers a free copy to those who vote for winners. So if I drive a few hundred readers to take the time to actually view my first 5,000 words, and they vote for it, and it wins a publishing contract with Kindle Publishing, I just lost a few hundred sales. That's right. Say 200 people were going to buy my book at $3.99 and I was going to get 70% of those sales. That's about $550 I just lost.

Sure, I've got the $1,500 advance, but I also want my prior customers to boost my book's launch and help it rise in the rankings. I won't get that if they all get free copies! HMMM.

Of the 75 books that have been chosen and published, about half that I checked are doing well enough to be ranked in the top 50,000. That's a couple book sales a day. Those with better rankings (I saw one at #8,000, one at #12,000 and one at #17,000) are selling 10 to 20 copies a day. That's great, but are they selling because of the program, or simply because they were going to sell anyway?

What's Interesting

Overall, since I saw many books that had been out several months and were listed at above 100,000 (that's less than a book a day in sales), we can assume that neither the pre-readers nor Amazon are able to predict with any great certainty which books are really worth the $1,500 advance. Sure, some will be easily picked, but many will still fail. Interesting.

What's your experience? Anyone submit and want to tell us about your good (or bad) fortune? Anybody get passed over and find that your self-published book is doing great?

Thanks for reading - Al W Moe


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